Houses

If These Walls Could Talk: Researching House Histories

February 11, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

Are you one of our community’s many “house-proud” residents curious about their home’s past? This February nationally known Land title expert and educator Joe Grabas will share tips on the variety of ways to research a house’s history. Techniques range from architectural and archaeological analysis, to newspapers, census and genealogical records, wills, inventories, dendrochronology, liens, obscure sources, such as tavern records, coroner’s reports, bankruptcies, etc.

From Farm to Suburb: The Birth of College Hill

February 21, 2016, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

College Hill is one of Maplewood’s most clearly identifiable neighborhoods due to its roster of collegiate street names. This section of town, as many in Maplewood, began originally as a farm, in this case a dairy farm worked for three generations by the Courter family. This exhibit will chronicle the history of the Courters, the Trimpi’s and others, and examine the evolution of this section of town from agricultural to suburban.

In Living Color: A History of House Paints in America

November 23, 2014, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

Calling all house-proud Maplewood residents! Need some ideas for paint colors? This profusely illustrated talk at 2:00 p.m. by preservation consultant and Columbia University Professor Janet W. Foster provides a fascinating look at the materials and colors of historic American architecture. Learn how the paint history on this particular house provides a great starting point for examining the trends that made architecture in the past both beautiful and fashionable.


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Landscaping Your Older House

April 13, 2014, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

In this informative talk by landscaper designer Patricia Tratebas, you will get helpful landscaping tips for Maplewood homes built in the early 20th c., plus a peek at the popular garden styles, plants and ornamentation of houses of this time period.

After The Hickories: Roosevelt Park

The extensive exhibit After The Hickories: Roosevelt Park that graced the Durand-Hedden House for most of 2012 traces the transformation of one hundred bucolic acres in the foothills of Orange Mountain from pre-Revolutionary farmland to their days as a grand 19th century country retreat to their new life as a fashionable early-20th century neighborhood still thriving today.

The Ackerson Company Houses

The Ackerson Company offered prospective buyers at least six pre-designed house models, as seen by these renderings from their brochure. Three were actually built on Curtiss Place and further research may uncover variants of others.

“The Hickories” and Theodore Roosevelt

In 1862 Cornelius Van Schaick Roosevelt, uncle of Theodore Roosevelt, came out from New York and purchased the farm of Isaac Smith in the Village. It comprised about one hundred acres of land extending up the mountain from Ridgewood Road beyond Wyoming Avenue, and from Durand Road to Curtiss Place.

A Fashionable Country Retreat

The C.V.S. Roosevelt Jr. mansion, built c. 1865, was a rambling country estate known as “The Hickories.” Its prominent tower would have been a landmark on the wooded slopes of South Mountain, signaling the social prominence of its owners. The design of the house exemplifies the romantic picturesque styles of architecture popular in America from the mid-to-late19th century and combines elements of the Italianate style with those of the Second Empire.

Clifford C. Wendehack

Architect Clifford C. Wendehack (1884-1948) lived in Upper Montclair, NJ, and practiced in New York City. His early architecture training was in Europe and New York and as a draftsman at the studio of Donn Barber, a New York proponent of Beaux-Arts architecture.

The American Four Square

Four-squares are the “little black dress” of American residential architecture. The typical four-square house had four rooms on the first floor and four on the second, and a generally cube-like overall structure.

Edward Balch: Builder and Visionary in Early 20th C. Maplewood

Edward C. Balch, who lived in Maplewood from 1890 until his death in 1934, was one of the most prominent builders of the time.

Kenneth Dalzell: A Maplewood Architect Rediscovered

This is the town that architect Kenneth Whitney Dalzell helped to create between 1911 and the 1930’s, building on the local culture of simple farmhouses of the late 18th and early 19th century and incorporating both the technology and changing family needs of the early 20th century.

Old Windows: Preserving and restoring the soul of the house

Your home’s original windows can be made to be as energy efficient as modern replacement windows -- with the added advantage of retaining the architectural integrity of your home.

Gustav Stickley and the Craftsman Home

“Lifestyle” is a concept that seems very late-20th century, but the work of Gustav Stickley, architect, furniture designer and manufacturer, publisher and social critic in the early 20th century, clearly strove to encompass and influence many aspects of life and living.

Harold Tatton, Maplewood Architect

Harold Tatton practiced architecture in the first half of the 20th century and specialized in the Colonial and Tudor Revival styles which grace much of our community.

Postcards from the Past: Glimpses of Our Towns From a Century Ago

Vintage postcards allow us to step back in time 100 years ago to explore the streets, neighborhoods and buildings of our communities as they looked then.

Flooring by the Numbers

Restoration of an old house is an ongoing process. In 2000, as Island Housewrights restoration experts worked to finish stripping the floorboards on the second floor of the Durand-Hedden House, Don DeFillo noticed some odd markings -- invisible when covered with paint -- on the ends of several boards.

A Brief History of The Durand-Hedden House

The Durand-Hedden House, whose original structure was built in about 1790, sits on two acres of the original plantation that was part of a 72-acre tract of land acquired by Ebenezer Hedden before 1740.

John Beam House - 1913

John Beam House was built in about 1913 by Edward Balch, one of the most important developers in turn-of-the-century Maplewood. John Beam, a realtor, was probably the first resident of the house, according to town directories going back as far as 1916.

Fleming Manor - 1840

Fleming Manor was built around 1840. In the 1870s, it was renovated in the fashionable Second Empire style with the addition of an elegant mansard roof, dormers and Italianate elements.

Lewis Pierson House - Vauxhall - 1843

Lewis Pierson, owner of Pierson’s Mill, built the House known as Vaux Hall in 1843. Vaux Hall and the Durand-Hedden House are the only early Maplewood houses still having a large share of land about them.

Timothy Ball House - 1743

The Timothy Ball House is one of the most interesting and impressive early houses in the region, both historically and structurally. It was built in 1743 by a grandson of Edward Ball, who settled in Newark in 1666 and was a signer of the Fundamental Agreement Among the Puritans.

Jonas Ball House - 1750

The Jonas Ball House was constructed in 1750 as a cooper shop, made of massive fieldstone and hand-hewn timber. It was the place where barrels and other containers were made on the plantation of Jonas Ball, one of seven surviving sons of Thomas Ball.

After The Hickories: Roosevelt Park

February 26, 2012, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

The tale of how young Teddy Roosevelt loved to roam his uncle Cornelius’ wooded Maplewood estate observing nature has often been told, but not the story of what happened decades later, after the property had been sold and “The Hickories” had burned.

Traditional House Styles for Modern Living

February 13, 2011, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

How does a 21st century residential architect who admires and respects (and lives in) the domestic style of a century ago reconcile those traditional design themes with the modern desire for big windows, sleek design, a family room and a wall for the flat screen TV? John Ike, a noted architect and Maplewood resident will provide some insight into those modern-day challenges.

“The Father of Maplewood”, Builder Edward C. Balch

February 21, 2010, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

A little over 100 years ago Maplewood resident and entrepreneur Edward C. Balch turned his attention to improving his adopted home, at that time a rural village. From about 1903 until 1921 Balch built almost two hundred houses in various styles on the streets climbing the slopes of South Mountain near his own home.

Kenneth Dalzell - Maplewood’s Most Prolific Architect?

September 27, 2009, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

This nearly forgotten architect designed a vast array of houses in Maplewood between about 1916 and 1960, working for individual clients and developers. Dalzell believed in well-designed, moderately priced homes, often in Colonial, Tudor and Mediterranean styles.

Was Kenneth Dalzell Maplewood’s Most Prolific Architect?

February 22, 2009, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

This nearly forgotten architect designed a vast array of houses in Maplewood, working from about 1915 and 1940 for individual clients and developers. Dalzell created well-designed moderately priced homes, often in Colonial, Tudor and Italian Revival styles.

Old Home Day at Durand-Hedden

January 13, 2008, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

Become a history detective: Come explore our community's own

How to Repair Old Windows

October 21, 2007, 1:00 - 4:00 PM

Paul Lewis of Two Guys from Newstead will show you how simple it is to repair your wood windows so that they once again work as they were designed. Learn how to “un-stick” your painted-shut windows, fix broken sash cords and chains, and replace broken glass. Also find out what steps you can take to make your windows more energy efficient.

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Membership in the Durand-Hedden House & Garden Association is open to all. Please consider your membership an invitation to join us as a volunteer or docent educator.